Is it possible to run Pleco on a Huawei phone?

I want to buy a Huawei phone but the lack of Pleco is a deal breaker. Will Pleco ever be available on the Huawei store? If not, is there an easy way to load it onto a Huawei phone?
 

Shun

状元
Hi broadfoodb,

I know the Pleco APK can be downloaded directly from Pleco, so as long as you can sideload on a Huawei phone, you can sideload Pleco on it. All the purchasing of Add-ons would then have to happen through the Pleco Store at store.pleco.com.

Hope this helps,

Shun
 
Thanks. It might be an issue because I have already bought a lot of the add-ons through the Google Play store so it might not be possible to transfer the license.
 

Shun

状元
You're welcome! Transferring of purchases should be easily possible on the Pleco Store thanks to the Registration ID system, and if everything else fails, Pleco Support should be able to do it manually for you, as well. So I don't see any problems in that regard.
 

Fernando

进士
As @Shun said, you probably can install Pleco and even restore your old purchases, but I wonder what makes a Huawei phone so compelling in comparison with our standard western poison.

But, again, I’m a crank who’d rather not use a smartphone at all if I could get away with it, so I guess I wouldn’t understand anyway.
 

Shun

状元
Hi Fernando, before broadfootb answers, I'd say they've got a much better price-performance ratio, similar to OnePlus.

Cheers, Shun
 
I live in China and Huawei phones are readily available here. I am thinking about buying the Huawei P50 because it has a 120Hz display and I want the model that has 12GB of RAM because I usually have more than 100 tabs open in my browser and it sometimes slows my phone down.

Smartphones are a great tool but many people misuse them. Some religious communities like the Haredi Orthodox Jews and the Amish have rules about smartphone usage because they recognize the potential of smartphones but they also recognize that smartphones and social media can erode a person's identity.

I spend hours everyday on my phone. I justify this because I am either using my smartphone to study or to do something work related. There are so many great apps for learning languages these days and it is more convenient than carrying around a thick dictionary.
 

Shun

状元
I agree completely. Using a smartphone can be as rewarding as reading a good book, or even more so, because it allows you to play a more active part.

It's a tool that can be used and misused. I think it's similar to a car in a way. You have to make sure that "you drive the car" and avoid that "the car drives you".
 
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Fernando

进士
I know smartphones can be useful and convenient. When I got my first smartphone, an iPhone 4, I was absolutely flabbergasted by how nice that thing was. I could email, take pictures with a thousand different funky filters, store and listen to my music, and also carry entire (offline) dictionaries in my pocket, which I used (and still use) extensively while reading. But that was a luxury product, and that's how I saw it then. Back then you could buy dumb phones for 30 bucks, get a SIM card off a shelf in any store and use it away anonymously, drug-dealer style, with no need for any sort of registration, and not be called a freak for it. And, at least in Europe, you could do that with an iPhone as well.

Now, even if you could still get a SIM that way (and you can't), you need a million online accounts to manage your life. We now use apps for a million different things, such as hailing a ride or ordering food or managing your finances with your bank. It's no longer simply the case the smartphones are convenient, now it's straightout inconvenient not to use them. And they leak your data and your habits and your location, all the time, to some people you're aware of and to some people you aren't. It's not a case of you being in the driver's seat vs you letting it drive you, it's about who's using your device against your interests behind your back. I guess if you're living in China it's all very clear to you there's nothing you can do about it, and you might as well get whatever device has the better specs for the money, whereas in the west we can complain about it, but realistically there's not much you can do about it either. So pick your poison.

As for the other social and pyschological harms smartphones can bring you, they're really the harms of social media. Smartphones make them easier and more portable, but don't create them.
 

Shun

状元
I didn't think of the privacy aspect, which is important, but it applies equally to desktop computers. As the legal systems are catching up with technological advances, I'm optimistic that this lack of control over one's data will not last forever.

My car analogy was more that you know what to expect when handling a car, always thinking a step ahead, instead of being startled by something that happens while you're driving, forcing you to react quickly if you wish to avoid an accident. At both times you're in the driver's seat, though. :)

I agree, smartphones offer a more direct path to information and interaction, and also, they are by their nature more superficial, because when you're on the road, you cannot/usually are not willing to devote the same amount of attention and concentration to them as when you are sitting in front of a desktop computer. But you can, if you want—you even should, most of the time, if you wish to use them in a healthy way.

Merry Christmas, Shun
 
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Fernando

进士
I agree that there is nothing wrong with smartphones as a tech, as long as people use them responsibly and mindfully. They're just connected computers in one's pocket. The problem is how they are exploited by unscrupulous people who have power and want more power.

I wish I were optimistic as you are about the evolution of our legal systems, but I don't believe anything positive is going to happen without significant pressure.

Thanks for the festive wishes. Also wish you, and everyone else here, a very happy Christmas!
 
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